Some Facts About GMOs

Joe Rappaport has it right!!

Scientific basis for GMO crops is false

 

 

Scientific basis for GMO crops is false

 

By Jon Rappoport

November 14, 2014

www.nomorefakenews.com

 

Unpredictable effects. Unknown outcomes. Potential health consequences. Uncertain gene technology.

 

These aren’t phrases biotech giants like to hear.

 

They prefer:

 

“One gene produces one protein.”

 

“Each gene has a specific function.”

 

This is the basis for the modern biotech industry, and it applies most definitely to GMO crops.

 

And it is false.

 

So for example, when Monsanto says the genes they insert in plants only serve to protect the plants from the herbicide Roundup and have no other function, they’re making it up.

 

For a brief summary of the situation, see Denise Caruso’s NY Times piece, “A Challenge to Gene Theory, a Tougher Look at Biotech,” July 1, 2007.

 

Caruso reports on the findings of an “exhaustive four-year effort…organized by the United States National Human Genome Research Institute and carried out by 35 groups from 80 organizations around the world.”

 

“…genes appear to operate in a complex network, and interact and overlap with one another and with other components in ways not yet fully understood.”

 

“Evidence of a networked [interacting] genome shatters the scientific basis for virtually every official risk [safety] assessment of today’s commercial biotech products, from genetically engineered crops to pharmaceuticals.”

 

In other words, each gene inserted in GMO food crops cannot be said to have only one function. There is reason to believe the inserted genes interact with genes already in the plants, and produce unknown effects.

 

Therefore, bland assurances of safety are smoke blowing in the wind.

 

“Jack Heinemann, a professor of molecular biology in the School of Biological Sciences at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand and director of its Center for Integrated Research in Biosafety”: ‘The real worry for us has always been that the commercial agenda for biotech may be premature, based on what we have long known was an incomplete understanding of genetics…’

 

Heinemann: “Because gene patents and the genetic engineering process itself are both defined in terms of genes acting independently, [government] regulators may be unaware of the potential impacts arising from these network [interacting] effects.”

 

Biotech companies like Monsanto are, to be sure, aware of this gaping hole in their “science” of gene-function. In fact, according to Heinemann, “Many biotech companies already conduct detailed genetic studies of their products that profile the expression of proteins and other elements. But they are not required to report most of this data to regulators, so they do not. Thus vast stores of important research information sit idle.”

 

This means that Monsanto or Dow can conceal what they’ve discovered about GMO hazards. They can hide findings that show unpredicted effects, when inserted genes meet and network with natural genes in the food crops.

 

If we were merely talking about studies done in labs and abstract articles in journals, that would be one thing. But of course, we are talking about millions of acres planted with GMO crops—and vast populations eating GMO food.

 

It’s all based on a simplistic and false notion about how genes function.

 

The biotech giants know this, government regulators know this, and many scientists know this.

 

But they hide what they know.

 

And all this dangerous fakery doesn’t even touch on the highly toxic effects of Roundup and other herbicides necessary to manage GMO crops.

 

Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections,   THE MATRIX REVEALEDEXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29thDistrict of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free emails at  NoMoreFakeNews.com.

 

qjrpress@gmail.com

 

Use this link to order Jon’s Matrix Collections:

MARKETPLACE

 

BELIEF SYSTEMS: Examining logic, reason and prejudice. By John Cooke

John and I share emails and recently he sent this gem to me from a collection of essays he is writing. I wanted any readers I have to read this and grin. Bill

BELIEF SYSTEMS: Examining logic, reason and prejudice.

By John Cooke

Nothing so raises the temperature of a conversation as when religious or political opinions are brought into it. On such occasions, logic and reason wither before the onslaught of prejudice. Can this be attributed to the fact that the seeds of both politics and religion are frequently sown before a child’s critical faculties have been sharpened? They thus embed themselves like a malignant mutation, unfettered by reason, to become a hard-wired component in the developing psyche? Continue Reading →

Something funny and comes with a message. If I were enlightened.

Maybe with comedy one can actually listen to the message. Bill

About Donnalou Stevens
To many, it may look like I am an over night success with ‘Older Ladies’ my first ever music video, but there’s a lot more to the story and the woman behind it than meets the eye. The joie de vivre that is seen consistently in my photos was hard won and well deserved. Born in Austin, TX, I came into this world with a fiery spirit, a gypsy heart and a creative streak that made everyone who knew me well think I was bound for fame. We all thought it would happen a lot earlier in my life and for years I was resentful it hadn’t. Continue Reading →

Reason, Religion and Ecology

Reason, Religion and Ecology
republished 11/15/14, originally published in Oct 2012

Reason is based on linking evidence to form a valid explanation. There is no evidence that a god exists. There are no answers to prayers, there is no supreme being ever seen or heard. The Universe may be infinite but no one knows for sure, but it’s much greater than any religion ever said. The big bang is only one explanation for how the universe was created, but its based on evidence. Astronomers and now physicists are finding evidence that may point to still other explanations. That’s the nature of science, theories explain facts until new facts are not explainable with the earlier theory. Science is a continuous discovery process. Religion, in contrast, offers no evidence, and assumes mythical beings exists who no one has ever seen or perceived. It’s a static view which cannot be challenged. Continue Reading →

Belief Systems

compiled by Wm Olkowski  republished from 1.30.12

Extracts from http://www.alternet.org/belief/153836/Once_Again%2C_Believers_Have_it_Wrong%3A_Atheists_Don%27t_Just_Want_Sex%2C_Drugs%2C_and_Lack_of_Morality/?page=3

The expansion of rights for women and minorities, the spread of democracy and separation of church and state, the rise of science and the Enlightenment — all these undeniably positive trends occurred in the teeth of fierce resistance from religious defenders of the status quo. Every time, the church authorities warned that changing the way things had always been was in opposition to God’s will and would surely bring disaster. And almost every time, once the change happened anyway and no disaster resulted, those same authorities switched sides and pretended they had been supporters all along.

This proves the point that every moral code, whether theistic or atheistic, changes over time as we gain new knowledge and our perspective widens. Churches and religious apologists don’t like to admit this, since it undermines their claim to be in possession of perfect moral truth from the beginning; which is why they’re usually the staunchest defenders of old and unjust systems and the very last ones to bend to the tide of progress, causing much needless human suffering in the meantime. They’d be much better off if they’d simply admit that there is no non-human moral authority, admit that their holy books and doctrines contain moral errors, and then join the rest of us living in the real world and using conscience to figure out how we can achieve the greatest good.

As sociologist Phil Zuckerman has documented, some of the highest rates of organic atheism in the world can be found in Canada, Australia, Japan and Europe, particularly the Scandinavian countries like Sweden, Denmark, Norway and Finland. And many of these same countries show up near the top in worldwide rankings of societal health indicators like life expectancy, child welfare, educational attainment, gender equality, and per capita income. As Zuckerman has found in his research, despite still having state-sponsored churches that they belong to for cultural reasons, most Danes and Swedes are completely indifferent to religion. It simply doesn’t play an important role in their daily lives. And far from collapsing into depravity or anarchy, these societies have remained free, secular, prosperous and peaceful.

And the correlation runs in the other direction as well. Sociologist Mark Regnerus, among others, points out that in America, the highest rates of teen pregnancy, divorce and sexually transmitted diseases are highest in the religious, socially conservative “red” states (in most of which abstinence is taught to the exclusion of all else), while in the more liberal and more secular “blue” states, young people tend to marry later, start families later, and have lower rates of divorce. The conclusion from Regnerus’ research: “religion is a good indicator of attitudes toward sex, but a poor one of sexual behavior, and… this gap is especially wide among teenagers who identify themselves as evangelical.”

When It Comes to Indiana Creationism Bill, It’s Not Just the Lawmakers Who Are Idiots… It’s the Media, Too!

The miseducation committee of the Indiana legislature recently approved a bill to allow the teaching of creationism in the schools, and nowthe Indianapolis newspaper approves, with the usual tepid and illegitimate arguments.

Much would depend on how teachers handle the origins of life in a biology or science class.

No, it doesn’t. A bill that inserts garbage into the curriculum is a bill that inserts garbage; it doesn’t matter if you think it could be used to make a lovely collage, or as an exercise in recycling, it’s still garbage. And if you trust teachers to do their job, let them do it without boneheaded cretins in the legislature telling them how.    Read more

By PZ Myers | Pharyngula
Posted on Monday, January 30, 2012 @ 07:03 AM

————————–

Another Religion Misinformation Campaign

http://www.alternet.org/belief/153909/conservatives_use_creationist_playbook_to_attack_climate_change_education_in_schools

 

Manning is a member of the National Science Teachers Association. Last year an online poll of its 60,000 members found that 82 percent had faced skepticism about climate change from students and 54 percent had faced skepticism from parents. Some respondents added comments: Students believe whatever it is their parents believe. . . . Administrators roll over when parents object. In a recent survey of about 1,900 current and former teachers by the National Earth Science Teachers Association, 36 percent reported they had been influenced directly or indirectly to teach “both sides” of the issue.

“We have been hearing for several years now that teachers were getting pushback on teaching climate change, and some of the playbook used by those promoting teaching ‘both sides’ was very similar to the attempt to have evolution ‘balanced’ by creationism and intelligent design,” said Mark McCaffrey, who is spearheading the Center’s new initiative. “From my experience working with teachers, it is clear that the so-called ‘controversy’ about climate change science is a major impediment to teachers and the polarized political climate around teaching the topic is a big problem.”

McCaffrey is a pioneer in climate change education. He’s cofounder of the Climate Literacy Network and while at the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) helped develop the Essential Principles of Climate Science, endorsed by the federal government’s U.S. Global Change Research Program.

Resources:

http://www.terc.edu/

http://cires.colorado.edu/

——————-

The Freedom From Religion Foundation will be suing the U.S. Forest Service over the unconstitutional presence of a Knights of Columbus shrine to Jesus in Flathead National Forest in Montana.

Given that America is a Christian nation founded solely on Judeo-Christian principles (a false claim that Christians would have you believe), U.S. presidents have always ended their State of the Union speeches with “God bless America,” right?

Wrong.

As noted by Robert Schlesinger, opinion editor of U.S. News and World Report (and son of historian Arthur Schlesinger Jr.), Article II, Section 3 of the Constitution mandates that the president “shall from time to time give to the Congress information of the state of the union, and recommend to their consideration such measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient.”

George Washington gave the first address in 1790. Thomas Jefferson thought a speech in person too “kingly” and gave Congress written ones, as did the next 13 presidents until Woodrow Wilson, who revived the oral address. Franklin Roosevelt was the first to call it “The State of the Union.”

None of them ended their speeches with “God bless America,” nor did any president until Richard Nixon in a non-SOTU address from the Oval Office.

And we all know how great a moral Christian he was.

————–

A great Rant:

But from where I stand these days, the only thing I see religion doing in the public sector is gay bashing and telling women, mostly poor and desperate and in deplorable financial and personal situations, what to do with their bodies. I see busybodies deciding what drugs they can dispense to which customers, or deciding that they don’t have to issue a marriage license because of some petty deity that I don’t believe in told them to hate their fellow citizens and ignore the law. In a country in dire financial straits but still spending billions and billions of dollars on education, I see religious folks actively and openly working to make our schoolkids dumber. I see them shooting people who provided a medical procedure, and I see others rummaging through people’s personal lives to find out who hasn’t lived up the word of God. I see glassy-eyed fools running for President claiming that vaccines that save lives actually cause cancer, or that if you get raped and are pregnant, you should just lie back and think of Jeebus and make the best of a bad situation. In fact, everywhere you look these days, if Christianity or religion is getting a mention, it means something ugly is happening and someone somewhere is being victimized, marginalized, or otherwise abused. Go read some of the arguments against integration and you’ll see the same bible verses used today against homosexuals. Fifty years from now, they’ll be recycling them again to trash someone else they don’t like or who isn’t good enough for them.

From: By John Cole | Balloon Juice
Posted on Tuesday, January 31, 2012 @ 02:42 PM

Prayer Breakfast at West Point

The Freedom From Religion Foundation has written a Jan. 31 letter to the U.S. Military Academy calling for it to do some “soul searching” over West Point’s annual so-called “National Prayer Breakfast,” after a controversy about Lt. Gen. Jerry Boykin’s invitation to speak.

It is appalling, given this history of incendiary and unprofessional comments, that the U.S. Military Academy would honor Boykin by inviting him to provide an address at a West Point event. His views are off-the-wall, conspiratorial, and advance a tired ‘persecuted’ Christian theme that seeks to pit Christians of his persuasion against everyone else,” wrote FFRF.

 

Bill Maher: “Atheism Is a Religion Like Abstinence Is a Sex Position”

During last night’s New Rules segment, Bill Maher noted that “Until someone claims to see Christopher Hitchens’ face in a tree stump, idiots must stop claiming that atheism is a religion.” He goes on:

Not only is atheism not a religion, it’s not even my hobby. And that’s the great thing about being an atheist — it requires so little of your time….

There is a growing trend in this country that needs to be called out, and that is to label any evidence-based belief a “religion.” Many conservatives now say that a belief in man-made climate change is a “religion,” and Darwinism is a “religion,” and of course atheism — the total lack of religion — is somehow a “religion” too, according to the always reliable Encyclopedia Moronica.

To believers he says, “You don’t get to put your unreason up on the same shelf as my reason.” Then he un-baptizes Mitt Romney’s dead father-in-law, because hey — if religious people get to do wacky things like that, why not atheist Bill Maher?

Watch the segment below, via Mediaite:

By Lauren Kelley | Sourced from AlterNet

Posted at February 4, 2012, 8:33 am

Secular Humanism, alternatively known as Humanism (often with a capital H to distinguish it from other forms of humanism), is a secular philosophy. It embraces humanreasonethics, and justice while specifically rejecting religious dogmasupernaturalismpseudoscience or superstition as the basis of morality and decision-making. From http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Secular_humanism

end

A Puritan’s ‘war against religion’

by Wm Olkowski, PhD

Roger Williams, the Puritan who founded Rhode Island, insisted on the state refraining from intervening in the relationship between humans and God.

“forced worship stinks in God’s nostrils.”

when one mixes religion and politics, one gets politics. So to protect the purity of the church, he demanded — 150 years before Jefferson — a “wall of separation between the garden of the church and the wilderness of the world.” …”when one mixes religion and politics, one gets politics. So to protect the purity of the church, he demanded — 150 years before Jefferson — a “wall of separation between the garden of the church and the wilderness of the world.”

In January, while conservative Christians and GOP presidential candidates were charging that “elites” have launched “a war against religion,” a federal court in Rhode Island ordered a public school to remove a prayer mounted on a wall because it imposed a belief on 16-year-old Jessica Ahlquist. The ruling seems particularly fitting because it was consistent not only with the 1st Amendment but with the intent of Roger Williams, who founded Rhode Island expressly to provide religious liberty and who called such forced exposure to prayer “spiritual rape.”

Forced exposure to prayer is “spiritual rape.”

As Williams’ nearly 400-year-old comment demonstrates, the conflict over the proper relationship between church and state is the oldest in American history. The 1st Amendment now defines this relationship, but understanding the full meaning of the amendment requires understanding its history, for the amendment was a specific response to specific historical events and was written with the recognition that freedom of religion was inextricably linked to freedom itself.

The church-state conflict began when Puritans, envisioning a Christian nation, founded what John Winthrop called “a citty upon a hill” in Massachusetts, and Williams rejected that vision for another: freedom. He insisted that the state refrain from intervening in the relationship between humans and God, stating that even people advocating “the most Paganish, Jewish, Turkish, or Antichristian consciences and worships” be allowed to pray — or not pray — freely, and that “forced worship stinks in God’s nostrils.”

Yet Williams was no atheist. He was a devout Puritan minister who, like other Massachusetts Puritans, fled religious persecution in England. Upon his arrival in 1631 he was considered so godly that Boston Puritans had asked him to lead their church. He declined — because he considered their church insufficiently pure.

Reverence for both Scripture and freedom led Williams to his position. His mentor was Edward Coke, the great English jurist who ruled, “The house of every one is as his castle,” extending the liberties of great lords — and an inviolate refuge where one was free — to the lowest English commoners. Coke pioneered the use of habeas corpus to prevent arbitrary imprisonment. And when Chancellor of England Thomas Egerton said, “Rex est lex loquens; the king is the law speaking,” and agreed that the monarch could “suspend any particular law” for “reason of state,” Coke decreed instead that the law bound the king. Coke was imprisoned — without charge — for his view of liberty, but that same view ran in Williams’ veins.

Equally important to Williams was Scripture. Going beyond the “render unto Caesar” verse in the New Testament, he recognized the difficulty in reconciling contradictory scriptural passages as well as different Bible translations. He even had before him an example of a new translation that served a political purpose. King James had disliked the existing English Bible because in his view it insufficiently taught obedience to authority; the King James Bible would correct that.

Given these complexities, Williams judged it impossible for any human to interpret all Scripture without error. Therefore he considered it “monstrous” for one person to impose any religious belief on another. He also realized that any government-sponsored prayer required a public official to pass judgment on something to do with God, a sacrilegious presumption. He also knew that when one mixes religion and politics, one gets politics. So to protect the purity of the church, he demanded — 150 years before Jefferson — a “wall of separation between the garden of the church and the wilderness of the world.”

ITS IN THE BIBLE SO WE MUST ABIDE

Dr. Laura Schlessinger is a radio personality who dispenses advice to people who call in to her radio show. Recently, she said that, as an observant Orthodox Jew, homosexuality is an abomination according to Leviticus 18:22 and cannot be condoned under any circumstance. The following is an open letter to Dr. Laura penned by an east coast resident, which was posted on the Internet. It’s funny, as well as informative:

 

Dear Dr. Laura:

Thank you for doing so much to educate people regarding God’s Law. I have learned a great deal from your show, and try to share that knowledge with as many people as I can. When someone tries to defend the homosexual lifestyle, for example, I simply remind them that Leviticus 18:22 clearly states it to be an abomination. End of debate. I do need some advice from you, however, regarding some of the other specific laws and how to follow them:

 

When I burn a bull on the altar as a sacrifice, I know it creates a pleasing odor for the Lord – Lev.1:9. The problem is my neighbors. They claim the odor is not pleasing to them. Should I smite them?

I would like to sell my daughter into slavery, as sanctioned in Exodus 21:7. In this day and age, what do you think would be a fair price for her?

 

I know that I am allowed no contact with a woman while she is in her period of menstrual uncleanliness – Lev.15:19- 24. The problem is, how do I tell? I have tried asking, but most women take offense.

 

Lev. 25:44 states that I may indeed possess slaves, both male and female, provided they are purchased from neighboring nations. A friend of mine claims that this applies to Mexicans, but not Canadians. Can you clarify?

 

Why can’t I own Canadians?

 

I have a neighbor who insists on working on the Sabbath. Exodus 35:2 clearly states he should be put to death. Am I morally obligated to kill him myself?

 

A friend of mine feels that even though eating shellfish is an abomination – Lev. 11:10, it is a lesser abomination than homosexuality. I don’t agree. Can you settle this?

 

Lev. 21:20 states that I may not approach the altar of God if I have a defect in my sight. I have to admit that I wear reading glasses. Does my vision have to be 20/20, or is there some wiggle room here?

Most of my male friends get their hair trimmed, including the hair around their temples, even though this is expressly forbidden by Lev. 19:27. How should they die?

 

I know from Lev. 11:6-8 that touching the skin of a dead pig makes me unclean, but may I still play football if I wear gloves?

 

My uncle has a farm. He violates Lev. 19:19 by planting two different crops in the same field, as does his wife by wearing garments made of two different kinds of thread (cotton/polyester blend). He also tends to curse and blaspheme a lot. Is it really necessary that we go to all the trouble of getting the whole town together to stone them? 

 

Lev.24:10-16. Couldn’t we just burn them to death at a private family affair like we do with people who sleep with their in-laws? (Lev. 20:14)

 

I know you have studied these things extensively, so I am confident you can help. Thank you again for reminding us that God’s word is eternal and unchanging.

 

Your devoted fan,

FREEDOM FROM RELIGION

 

FFRF announces new ‘Secular Vote’ webpage

A call to freethought, family and freedom

August 13, 2012

Dear Freethinker:

The 2012 election will be pivotal in America’s history – and freethinkers can be the deciding voice!

The “Nones” (nonreligious) conservatively make up a fifth of the U.S. adult population. At least a quarter of young adults are “Nones.” This makes seculars as powerful as the core “religious right.”

Inform the debate so that secular voices are heard and our vote counts! Register yourselves and others, and participate by voting in upcoming run-offs and on November 6.

Our nation faces major challenges: the economy, increasing poverty, environmental crises. Educational challenges and competing in a global market are made more problematic in America, which is handicapped by misplaced loyalty to religion over progress and reason.

The political debate is further complicated by the intense pressure on political candidates to wear religion on their sleeves, by “gotcha” issues which encourage politicians to kowtow to religious lobbies, and by polls which still show that an atheist would still be voters’ least desirable presidential candidate. Only 54% of Americans recently told Gallup

they would vote for an atheist (which is up from previous polls) and 58% would vote for a Muslim, while 90% or more of Americans would vote for a black, a woman, Catholic, Hispanic or Jewish presidential candidate.This is a country where half of the population rejects evolution, making Americans credulous, uninformed and vulnerable to political manipulation. Many religiously-motivated referenda will be appearing on ballots, which is used as a way to lure “religious right” voters to the polls.

(Get one of these bumperstickers)

The religious right remains dogged in its religion-based attacks on the separation between state and church, specifically citing scripture and doctrine to target women’s rights, reproductive liberty, health care reform, gay rights, and marriage equality.

Never in our history has there been a greater need for engaged, informed secular citizens to stand up for freethought, family and freedom.

(Get one of these bumper stickers)

(Get one of these lapel pins)

The religious right — fundamentalist and Catholic churches — are tirelessly exploiting church congregations to reach and influence voters. We expect many election-year political abuses. Some theocratic organizations are even openly encouraging ministers to break the IRS code and endorse from the pulpit.

Student voters

A special word to freethinking students — this is an exciting time to be on campus, where you can make a difference. Make voter registration the goal of your freethought clubs through November 6. Set up tables. Arm yourself with the facts. Know your rights. Check with your city or county voter registrar’s office to ensure you and your friends know how to register and apply in time for the appropriate ID (government photo ID is being required now in many states that used to accept campus photo ID).

Standing up for our godless and secular Constitution,

Dan Barker and Annie Laurie Gaylor

Co-Presidents, Freedom From Religion Foundation

As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, FFRF is strictly prohibited from engaging in political campaigns. We do not endorse or oppose any candidates for public office at any level of government. This page is merely intended to encourage our members and other American secularists to get out the vote this election season.

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The Freedom From Religion Foundation, based in Madison, Wis., a 501(c)(3) nonprofit educational charity, is the nation’s largest association of freethinkers (atheists, agnostics), and has been working since 1978 to keep religion and government separate.

Quote from Felix Adler: Religions Produce Wars

“For more than three thousand years men have quarreled concerning the formulas of their faith. The earth has been drenched with blood shed in this cause, the face of day darkened with the blackness of the crimes perpetrated in its name. There have been no dirtier wars than religious wars, no bitterer hates than religious hates, no fiendish cruelty like religious cruelty; no baser baseness than religious baseness. It has destroyed the peace of families, turned the father against the son, the brother against the brother. And for what? Are we any nearer to unanimity? On the contrary, diversity within the churches and without has never been so widespread as at present. Sects and factions are multiplying on every hand, and every new schism is but the parent of a dozen others.”

— Felix Adler, founding address ofNew York Society for Ethical Culture, May 15, 1876

Compiled by Annie Laurie Gaylor Freedom from Religion Foundation

 

Population Control: Deliberate or by Default

Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, an 1887 painting by Victor Vasnetsov. The Lamb is visible at the top.Image from Wikepaedia Commons.

Population Control: Deliberate or by Default

by William Olkowski, PhD, reissued 8.6.12

 

Homosexuals don’t reproduce kids.  They raise other people’s kids if they have kids.  And that is one of the best reasons why homosexuals should have all the rights of heterosexuals? Because it’s one of the best ways to live into the future, i.e., without kids.  There are other reasons why the religious crazies are wrong about homosexuals, including that it is part of many species behavior, thus a natural pattern of behavior.  The famous animal behaviorist, Konrad Lorenz documented homosexual behaviors in Graylag geese, for example.  Graylags mate for life and when a pair lost a mate, they formed another pair with a member of the same sex.  Since then hundreds of examples have been documented in other species.  Humans are not that different from other species, especially primates.

This idea flies in the face of the belief systems of the Abrahamic religions: Christianity, Judaism, and Islam.  These are old belief systems with their mythical stories and constitute cultural artifacts like the fossils of the archeologists.  Supernaturalism is the core of these belief systems and seems to bring up all sorts of primitive feelings that help people bind together in groups.  Just like those fossils you can find supernaturalisms poking out from other people, sometimes even friends, which is shocking.  For example, the astrology of present day is a derivative and substitutes for real knowledge.

I joke that one of the best things Christianity brought to human cultures is the idea of a day-off, i.e., Sunday.  But in reality the day off goes back before Christ, whoever that was.

But otherwise it has been a disastrous terror campaign full of belief in witches, ghosts, and evil punished by burnings, property seizures, book burnings and mind damage of all sorts.  It reinforces magical thinking and supernaturalism even in the face of recent hard won knowledge of how the natural world works.  The full extent of this history is mostly glossed over by most Christians.

But my friends know this about what I think.  But consider the following argument derived from a biological idea: The Balance of Nature.  This refers to the idea that once a population exceeds its carrying capacity something will come along to cut down the population to match the carrying capacity of the environment.

I argue that this point of exceeding the carrying capacity of the Earth has already been reached.  Consider the numbers of diseased people, the poverty levels, the homeless, the proportion who have no access to health care and adequate food supplies, the ever growing size of the human population and how most people live today.

Who or What will Restore the Balance of Nature?

There are only two ways to restore the Balance of Nature: 1) deliberately or 2) by default.  By default I mean Pestilence, War, and Famine.  The deliberate means are birth control and its associated back up system: abortion.   Birth control and sterilization are preventative processes.  But these all require good sex education, which is opposed by religious fanatics.  The result is why I see so many young girls pushing baby carriages.  And now I see multiple babies in single baby carriages. The later phenomenon is due to fertility drugs which stimulate multiple ovulations.  So there are some people working to produce greater imbalance.  The key problem I lay at the feet of the male dominated Christian churches as I am most familiar with them.

Death is inevitable, unfortunately, but Pestilence, War and Famine can all be eliminated, at least in theory.  End.

Is the 10 Commandments the Basis for our Constitution?

by William Olkowski, PhD, 8.6.12.

NO, NO, NO, for pictures see the FFRF website and sources below or the FFRF website: Did you know.

The 10 commandments are not the basis for the US Constitution as many religious people claim.  They are ignorant of the facts and are merely repeating things they have heard.  Consider, instead some actual facts as collected by the Freedom From Religion Foundation (FFRF):

Was the 10 Commandments the basis for the US Constitution?

Ans: NO

Did you know that the purpose of the Ten Commandments was to establish the ancient nation of Israel, not the nation of the United States?

 Did you know that the purpose of the First Commandment was to declare which god among many (Elohim) was to be worshipped by the nation of Israel?

Did you know that the first four Commandments have nothing to do with law or ethics? They are religious edicts.

Did you know that the First Commandment violates our Constitution? Did you know that the United States Government cannot tell citizens what god to worship, how many gods to worship, or that we should worship any god(s) at all? Did you know the phrase “Thou shalt have no other gods before me” contradicts the Bill of Rights?

Did you know that breaking the first Commandment is not illegal under American law?

Did you know that making graven images is not illegal under American law? Exodus 20:4-5

Do you know that the second commandment violates the First Amendmentguarantee of freedom of speech?

Did you know that taking the “lord’s name” in vain is not illegal under American law?

Do you know that this commandment also violates the freedom of speech?

Did you know that failing to worship on the Sabbath is not illegal under American law? Do you know that our Bill of Rights guarantees freedom of religion?

Did you know that it is not illegal to dishonor parents under American law?
Although respect and honor are good ideas, especially within a family, there is no American law that requires it.

Did you know that adultery is not illegal under federal law?
Although adultery is a serious matter with social and moral consequences, it is not (and should not be) a federal crime in the United States.

Did you know that it is not illegal to “covet” your neighbor’s property under American law?  This commandment, if enforced, would undermine our entire system of free enterprise!

If American law is based on Hebrew scripture, why are 70% of actions forbidden by the Ten Commandments legal in the United States?

Why will no officer of the law arrest you for any of these acts that were clearly prohibited by the ancient Israelites?
Could it be that American law is based on something else?

Did you know that only three of the Ten Commandments have any relevance to modern American law? Did you know that these three humanistic precepts existed long before the ancient Israelites claimed the copyright?

Did you know that American law allows for mitigating circumstances, degrees of homicide, self defense, while the Ten Commandments do not? Did you know that telling a lie is generally not illegal under American law (except in proscribed circumstances such as perjury and truth in advertising)?

Exodus 20:17

Did you know that the Tenth Commandment insultingly lumps women with property, along with houses, slaves, and animals?

——————————————————————————-
19th Amendment
 to the Constitution
1920

The right of citizens of the United Statesto vote
shall not be denied or abridged by the United States
or by any State on account of sex.

——————————————————————————-

If American law is based on the Ten Commandments, why are women legally equal with men in this country?


 

Did you know that the Supreme Court, following the Constitution, has declared that the Ten Commandments are “undeniably a sacred text” (which may not be posted in public schools)?

Wording from Stone v. Graham, 1980

Did you know that no U.S. Supreme Court decision has ever been basedon the Ten Commandments?

Did you know that the Supreme Court decides whether an action or law is constitutional or unconstitutional, not whether it is biblical or unbiblical? .

Did you know that none of the U.S. founding documents mentions the Ten Commandments?

Did you know that during the Constitutional Convention when our secular Constitution was adopted, the Ten Commandments were not mentioned once?

Did you know there was no formal prayer at the Constitutional Convention?

THEN WHAT IS THE BASIS OF AMERICAN LAW?

Did you know that the basis of American Law is the U.S. Constitution, not the Ten Commandments or any religious teaching?

——————————————————————————-
First Amendment
 to the Constitution

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion,
or prohibiting the free exercise thereof;
or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press;
or the right of the people peaceably to assemble,
and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

——————————————————————————-

Did you know that the United States Constitution–the basis of American law–is a completely godless document?

Do you know that the only references to religion in the Constitution are exclusionary?

——————————————————————————-

U.S. Constutition, Article VI, paragraph 3

. . .  no religious test shall ever be required as a qualification
to any office or public trust under theUnited States.

——————————————————————————-

Did you know that the U.S. Constitution is not based on a king, deity, goddess, lord, monarch or sovereign authority?

Did you know that the sovereign authority of the U.S. Constitution is “We, the people”?

Did you know that the “consent of the governed” (mentioned in the Declaration of Independence) is an anti-biblical concept?

Did you know that our secular Constitution is what makes the United States truly great?


REFERENCES & NOTES

Religious Symbols in the U.S.National Capitol

snopes.com/politics/religion/capital.asp

Symbols of law at the Supreme Court

www.supremecourt.gov/about/symbolsoflaw.pdf

Statues of Contemplation of Justice and Authority of Law

www.supremecourt.gov/about/FraserStatuesInfoSheet.pdf

Inner door, as described by guides at the Supreme Court

One report of the guides’ remarks, told by a surprised pastor who visited the building, appears here.

Western Pediment

www.supremecourt.gov/about/westpediment.pdf

Bronze doors

www.supremecourt.gov/about/bronzedoors.pdf

Courtroom Friezes: North and South Walls

www.supremecourt.gov/about/north&southwalls.pdf

Courtroom Friezes: East and West Walls

www.supremecourt.gov/about/east&westwalls.pdf

Eastern Pediment

http://www.supremecourt.gov/about/eastpediment.pdf

Fasces

The term “fascism” derives from fasces, which represented “strength through unity,” because it is harder to break a bundle than a single stick.

Penalty for working on the sabbath

“Six days shall work be done, but on the seventh day there shall be to you an holy day, a sabbath of rest to the Lord: whoseoever doeth work therein shall be put to death. Ye shall kindle no fire throughout your habitations upon the sabbath day.” (Exodus 35:2) For the chilling application of this law, see Numbers 15:32-36, where a man who picked up sticks on the sabbath was stoned, “and he died; as the Lord commanded Moses.”

“Consent of the Governed” antibiblical

“There is a way that seems right to a man, but its end is the way to death.” (Proverbs 14:12)
“Trust in the Lord with all your heart, And lean not on your own understanding; In all your ways acknowledge Him, And He shall direct your paths. Do not be wise in your own eyes.” (Proverbs 3:5-7)
“Let every soul be subject unto the higher powers. For there is no power but of God: the powers that be are ordained of God.” (Romans 13:1)
“The LORD has established His throne in the heavens; And His sovereignty rules over all.” (Psalm 103:19)

* Some Christian “Did You Know” sites to which this article responds:

America’s Christian History — The Ten Commandments — Did You Know? — DID YOU KNOW?

(Prepared by Dan Barker for the Freedom From Religion Foundation, August 2012.)

 

FAQ CATEGORIES

 

Reason and Religion can Coexist?

Posted as a comment on Coeur d’Alene Press, FFRF in the News

August 3, 2012

Reason and religion can co-exist

August 2, 2012

http://www.cdapress.com/news/local_news/article_ed344ede-dcff-11e1-bc68-001a4bcf887a.html

The article on this website indicated above received this posting from me today, 8/3/12.  This article indicated above claims that reason and religion can co-exist.  The article reasons that there are only three explanations for the Universe, two are scientific, which the article claims are false, and the third, is therefore the only reasonable explanation: which is that a supernatural being called god did it.

DearCoeur d’Alene Press (Coeur d’Alene, Idaho),

Reason is based on linking evidence to form an explanation.  There is no evidence that a god exists.  There are no answers to prayers, there is no supreme being ever seen or heard.  The Universe may be infinite but no one knows for sure, but it’s much greater than any religion ever said.  The big bang is only one explanation for how the universe was created.  Astronomers and now physicists are finding evidence that may point to still other explanations.  That’s the nature of science, theories explain facts until new facts are not explainable with the earlier theory.  Science is a continuous discovery process.

Religion, in contrasts offers no evidence but assumes the that mythical being(s) who no one has ever seen or perceived, created the universe.  There is an “s” on the word being, because almost every religion has its own god or gods who are deemed responsible for the creation of the Universe.  Can they all be right?  Not unless they assume they have all the same god. And that would be heresy.

Religions offer a static view of the Universe which cannot be challenged.  There may be new explanations for the construction of the Universe, but they will not ever be supernatural as claimed by religion.  Religion and science cannot coexist in explaining natural phenomena, with one exception, the study of hallucinations induced by propaganda and repetition, particularly on young forming individuals before they have the capacity for critical thinking.  And no church teaches critical thinking.  Reason and religion are at best two ends of a pole with a big gap between.  Science is based on reason, religion is based on myth.

end

Poem from a Friend, Jose Cross (deceased)

My Life: A Friend’s Poem Found Amidst My Stuff

My friend Jose Cross (formally he called himself Jose Manuel dos Santos Cross) passed away just after Helga this year (2012) in the late spring.  He was an iconoclastic artist who did not really care to sell his creations, which were unique wood carvings, paintings (charcoal, oils), sketches, pen and inks, photographs and writings, which included some poems and essays.  He was a Portuguese immigrant who came to the US at age 9, later joined the merchant marine and roamed the world via different boats.  One of his favorite writers was Jack London who wrote stories about the ocean world.  I found some of London’s work gloomy at times which seemed to pervade Jose’s dark house as he built it himself while he and his wife Virginia raised two kids, Amalia and Valon.  He worked building the house by building ramps to hold a wheeled chair he strapped himself to which he would use to move around the structure on ramps as it was built.  This itself was a great accomplishment.  The house constructions too reflected his sculpture work which filled the place on the walls and a whole studio attached to the house.  Many pieces were real masterpieces, which when I showed them, with his permission, to local artists and friends all were blown away.

I joked with him that he should convert to being a paper artist as all his stuff required transporting if anyone else would see it.  And that would be a challenge.  And I emphasized that paper was very light to carry.  He smiled.  There was one piece which the world should see.  He called it: Tootalltabletootall, all one word.  He was a great word smith who loved to make up word combinations and long sentences which produced a sort of twinkle in his personality and certainly in my mind.  The TALL Table was actually a tall table, beautifully constructed and painted (3 coats), about 14 feet tall with a full course meal with wine bottle and roasted pig, something like over 100 pieces of dinner wear all carved out of wood.  The table was too tall to actually view so he installed a mirror so a viewer could see the setting.  I though it deserved to be in the Smithsonian or somewhere important so millions could see it as it spoke vast truths about hunger and the distribution of resources.  It was displayed one time in a local gallery.

Helga knew Jose from her Beatnik days when they would all take various substances together and remembered her friend as a tall delightful handsome guy who had lost a leg in a boating accident involving a rope.  He settled for a one time payment and used it to buy a bar in Oakland which he eventually lost someway.  Then, he became an artist after going through the art college in Oakland, the College of Arts and Crafts.  We gave a talk there once.  These are just fragments of what I learned from him when we talked late into the night as I lay down next to him to view his TV, and watch Jon Stewart, a PBS show or a dance or whatever. And we would talk.

 

 

 

This opportunity to connect up came about when H and I came down the coast on our first big journey after we retired back in 2000, or so.  We followed the West coast up and around the coast of Washington and came back down stopping at various places.  We had a Lance camper on the back of a big Ford diesel pickup then.  The Mendocino Coast seemed to me to be the most spectacular scenery we saw on the entire coast, especially because it was accessible.  The coast was always a fascination for us, and I believe it’s why Jose settled in Mendocino.  In the old days Mendocino was a rather isolated artist colony mostly, but over the years it built up into a tourist local with its group of galleries, small shops and restaurants it became when we visited there from about 2000 to 2009.  Jose let us park and we helped him with food purchases in exchange for an electric supply for our RV.

Jose was what I like to call a Luddite, because he refused to use a computer, and there was no reception for a portable phone, and he had no answering machine, things almost everyone had in those days.  He typed on an old clunker (like Woody Allen) and wrote many funny things which I hope to add to this memorial someday.  But here is the poem I started out to copy.

First a bit about how I found this in my things.  I keep all sorts of things and have accumulated gobs of paper, mostly, all sorted into various categories which I stumble upon now in my decrepitude.  I am determined to not leave a mess when I go, so I have recycled over 60 or so boxes so far.

In this array of stuff I found this poem and thought it was one of mine as I was in the habit of dashing off something now and then amidst the rush of life, and not taking the time to adequately file it so I could find it again someday.  But then I saw Jose’s name on the bottom and realized it was from him.  I tell you this because we had a mutual viewpoint about belief that I don’t think his wife, nor children had, although for that I am speculating from rather meager evidence.  Here’s is the poem I wished I had written: (it has no punctuation nor a title, but I would title it Matter.

No Title

We are doomed or blessed with limited perception about

What

When

How Much

Why

 

Does it matter

Does it really matter

How much does it matter

How much matter is there

 

Is there enough time to find out

Is there enough space

To encompass time

Is there enough time

 

And do i care

And do i need to care

And will matter be affected

If i do not care

 

And will time matter

But matter will be timely

From the beginning

Onward to infinity

 

And i … and you

Will matter

As matter

Throughout time

 

end

 

 

What will a Christian Nation Bring?

What will a Christian Nation Bring?

Selections by William Olkowski, PhD.  Reissued 7.28.12

Consider what this man said, what happen afterward, and who he sounds like today?

“The national government will maintain and defend the foundations on which the power of our nation rests.

It will offer strong protection to Christianity as the very basis of our collective morality.

Today Christians stand at the head of our country. We want to fill our culture again with the Christian spirit.

We want to burn out all the recent immoral developments in literature, in the theatre, and in the press — in short, we want to burn out the poison of immorality which has entered into our whole life and culture as a result of LIBERAL excess during the past years.”

— Adolf Hitler;

Taken from The Speeches of Adolf
Hitler, 1922-1939, Vol. 1, Michael Hakeem, Ph.D.
(London, Oxford University Press, 1942), pp. 871-872.

==========

 

Other Extracts from http://www.alternet.org/belief/153836/Once_Again%2C_Believers_Have_it_Wrong%3A_Atheists_Don%27t_Just_Want_Sex%2C_Drugs%2C_and_Lack_of_Morality/?page=3

The expansion of rights for women and minorities, the spread of democracy and separation of church and state, the rise of science and the Enlightenment — all these undeniably positive trends occurred in the teeth of fierce resistance from religious defenders of the status quo. Every time, the church authorities warned that changing the way things had always been was in opposition to God’s will and would surely bring disaster. And almost every time, once the change happened anyway and no disaster resulted, those same authorities switched sides and pretended they had been supporters all along.

This proves the point that every moral code, whether theistic or atheistic, changes over time as we gain new knowledge and our perspective widens. Churches and religious apologists don’t like to admit this, since it undermines their claim to be in possession of perfect moral truth from the beginning; which is why they’re usually the staunchest defenders of old and unjust systems and the very last ones to bend to the tide of progress, causing much needless human suffering in the meantime. They’d be much better off if they’d simply admit that there is no non-human moral authority, admit that their holy books and doctrines contain moral errors, and then join the rest of us living in the real world and using conscience to figure out how we can achieve the greatest good.

As sociologist Phil Zuckerman has documented, some of the highest rates of organic atheism in the world can be found in Canada, Australia, Japan and Europe, particularly the Scandinavian countries like Sweden, Denmark, Norway and Finland. And many of these same countries show up near the top in worldwide rankings of societal health indicators like life expectancy, child welfare, educational attainment, gender equality, and per capita income. As Zuckerman has found in his research, despite still having state-sponsored churches that they belong to for cultural reasons, most Danes and Swedes are completely indifferent to religion. It simply doesn’t play an important role in their daily lives. And far from collapsing into depravity or anarchy, these societies have remained free, secular, prosperous and peaceful.

And the correlation runs in the other direction as well.  Sociologist Mark Regnerus, among others, points out that in America, the highest rates of teen pregnancy, divorce and sexually transmitted diseases are highest in the religious, socially conservative “red” states (in most of which abstinence is taught to the exclusion of all else), while in the more liberal and more secular “blue” states, young people tend to marry later, start families later, and have lower rates of divorce. The conclusion from Regnerus’ research: “religion is a good indicator of attitudes toward sex, but a poor one of sexual behavior, and… this gap is especially wide among teenagers who identify themselves as evangelical.”

When It Comes to Indiana Creationism Bill, It’s Not Just the Lawmakers Who Are Idiots… It’s the Media, Too!

The miss-education committee of the Indiana legislature recently approved a bill to allow the teaching of creationism in the schools, and now the Indianapolis newspaper approves, with the usual tepid and illegitimate arguments.

Much would depend on how teachers handle the origins of life in a biology or science class.

No, it doesn’t. A bill that inserts garbage into the curriculum is a bill that inserts garbage; it doesn’t matter if you think it could be used to make a lovely collage, or as an exercise in recycling, it’s still garbage. And if you trust teachers to do their job, let them do it without boneheaded cretins in the legislature telling them how.    Read more 

By PZ Myers | Pharyngula
Posted on Monday, January 30, 2012 @ 07:03 AM

Another Religion Misinformation Campaign

http://www.alternet.org/belief/153909/conservatives_use_creationist_playbook_to_attack_climate_change_education_in_schools

Manning is a member of the National Science Teachers Association. Last year an online poll of its 60,000 members found that 82 percent had faced skepticism about climate change from students and 54 percent had faced skepticism from parents. Some respondents added comments: Students believe whatever it is their parents believe. . . . Administrators roll over when parents object. In a recent survey of about 1,900 current and former teachers by the National Earth Science Teachers Association, 36 percent reported they had been influenced directly or indirectly to teach “both sides” of the issue.

“We have been hearing for several years now that teachers were getting pushback on teaching climate change, and some of the playbook used by those promoting teaching ‘both sides’ was very similar to the attempt to have evolution ‘balanced’ by creationism and intelligent design,” said Mark McCaffrey, who is spearheading the Center’s new initiative. “From my experience working with teachers, it is clear that the so-called ‘controversy’ about climate change science is a major impediment to teachers and the polarized political climate around teaching the topic is a big problem.”

McCaffrey is a pioneer in climate change education. He’s cofounder of the Climate Literacy Network and while at the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) helped develop the Essential Principles of Climate Science, endorsed by the federal government’s U.S. Global Change Research Program.

Resources:

http://www.terc.edu/

http://cires.colorado.edu/

The Freedom From Religion Foundation will be suing the U.S. Forest Service over the unconstitutional presence of a Knights of Columbus shrine to Jesus inFlatheadNational ForestinMontana.

Given thatAmericais a Christian nation founded solely on Judeo-Christian principles (a false claim that Christians would have you believe),U.S.presidents have always ended their State of the Union speeches with “God blessAmerica,” right?

Wrong.

As noted by Robert Schlesinger, opinion editor of U.S. News and World Report (and son of historian Arthur Schlesinger Jr.), Article II, Section 3 of the Constitution mandates that the president “shall from time to time give to the Congress information of the state of the union, and recommend to their consideration such measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient.”

George Washington gave the first address in 1790. Thomas Jefferson thought a speech in person too “kingly” and gave Congress written ones, as did the next 13 presidents until Woodrow Wilson, who revived the oral address. Franklin Roosevelt was the first to call it “The State of theUnion.”

None of them ended their speeches with “God blessAmerica,” nor did any president until Richard Nixon in a non-SOTU address from the Oval Office.

And we all know how great a moral Christian he was.

A great Rant:

But from where I stand these days, the only thing I see religion doing in the public sector is gay bashing and telling women, mostly poor and desperate and in deplorable financial and personal situations, what to do with their bodies.  I see busybodies deciding what drugs they can dispense to which customers, or deciding that they don’t have to issue a marriage license because of some petty deity that I don’t believe in told them to hate their fellow citizens and ignore the law. In a country in dire financial straits but still spending billions and billions of dollars on education, I see religious folks actively and openly working to make our schoolkids dumber.  I see them shooting people who provided a medical procedure, and I see others rummaging through people’s personal lives to find out who hasn’t lived up the word of God.  I see glassy-eyed fools running for President claiming that vaccines that save lives actually cause cancer, or that if you get raped and are pregnant, you should just lie back and think of Jeebus and make the best of a bad situation.  In fact, everywhere you look these days, if Christianity or religion is getting a mention, it means something ugly is happening and someone somewhere is being victimized, marginalized, or otherwise abused.  Go read some of the arguments against integration and you’ll see the same bible verses used today against homosexuals.  Fifty years from now, they’ll be recycling them again to trash someone else they don’t like or who isn’t good enough for them.

From: By John Cole | Balloon Juice
Posted on Tuesday, January 31, 2012 @ 02:42 PM

Prayer Breakfast at West Point

The Freedom From Religion Foundation has written a Jan. 31 letter to the U.S. Military Academy calling for it to do some “soul searching” overWest Point’s annual so-called “National Prayer Breakfast,” after a controversy about Lt. Gen. Jerry Boykin’s invitation to speak.

It is appalling, given this history of incendiary and unprofessional comments, that the U.S. Military Academy would honor Boykin by inviting him to provide an address at aWest Pointevent. His views are off-the-wall, conspiratorial, and advance a tired ‘persecuted’ Christian theme that seeks to pit Christians of his persuasion against everyone else,” wrote FFRF.

Secular Humanism, alternatively known as Humanism (often with a capital H to distinguish it from other forms of humanism), is a secular philosophy. It embraces humanreasonethics, and justice while specifically rejecting religious dogmasupernaturalismpseudoscience or superstition as the basis of morality and decision-making.

From http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Secular_humanism

end

 

 

Bill Maher: “Atheism Is a Religion Like Abstinence Is a Sex Position”

Bill Maher: “Atheism Is a Religion Like Abstinence Is a Sex Position”

Excerpts by William Olkowski, PhD

7.28.12

 

During a New Rules segment, Bill Maher noted that “Until someone claims to see Christopher Hitchens’ face in a tree stump, idiots must stop claiming that atheism is a religion.” He goes on:

Not only is atheism not a religion, it’s not even my hobby. And that’s the great thing about being an atheist — it requires so little of your time….

There is a growing trend in this country that needs to be called out, and that is to label any evidence-based belief a “religion.” Many conservatives now say that a belief in man-made climate change is a “religion,” and Darwinism is a “religion,” and of course atheism — the total lack of religion — is somehow a “religion” too, according to the always reliable Encyclopedia Moronica.

To believers he says, “You don’t get to put your unreason up on the same shelf as my reason.” Then he un-baptizes Mitt Romney’s dead father-in-law, because hey — if religious people get to do wacky things like that, why not atheist Bill Maher?

Watch the segment below, via Mediaite:

By Lauren Kelley | Sourced from AlterNet

Posted at February 4, 2012, 8:33 am

Want a short education in politics and religion:

https://mailgoogle.com/mail/?tab=wm#inbox/135879067301a945